One of the oldest English-founded cities in North America, St. John’s is the perfect blend of small-town charm and big-city comforts. Wander down narrow streets lined with colorful row houses. Visit Quidi Vidi, a charming village-within-a-city that embodies the spirit of an old fishing port. The Rooms culture center, home to a museum, art gallery and archives, stands next to the twin clock towers of the impressive Basilica of St. John the Baptist.

  • Seated Tour Seated Tour
  • Light Activity/Walking Light Activity/Walking
  • Moderate Activity/Walking Moderate Activity/Walking
  • Most Active or Strenuous Most Active or Strenuous
  • Minimal Activity Required Minimal Activity Required
  • Regent Choice Regent Choice
  • Gourmet Explorer Gourmet Explorer
  • Meal Meal
  • Evening Tour Evening Tour
Sort By: Activity Level

Sort By

Filter by: All

Filter by:

  • Explore the First City

    Take in the considerable highlights in and around St. John’s, a city founded in the late 16th century at the very eastern edge of North America.

    After departing from the pier, you will enjoy a brief drive through St. John’s to Signal Hill, where signal flags were once flown to announce the names of approaching ships. It was also here in 1901 that Guglielmo Marconi received the first transatlantic wireless signal. While strolling the hill’s boardwalks, you will learn about the military history of this strategic site.

    Then, it’s on to downtown St. John’s, North America’s oldest and most easterly city. As you drive through the narrow crisscrossing streets, you will pass the Government House, the residence of the Lieutenant Governor of Newfoundland and Labrador. It was constructed of red sandstone quarried from Signal Hill in 1831. Other landmarks include rows of colorful wooden Victorian homes and several churches on the Canadian Register of Historic Places, including the beautiful Basilica Cathedral of St. John the Baptist.

    Nearby Cape Spear is also a National Historic Site, as you will discover during an enlightening visit. The cape is noted for being the easternmost point in North America and the site of the province’s oldest surviving lighthouse. There is also an historical gun battery that was manned during World War II to protect Newfoundland from German U-boats.

    After visiting Cape Spear, you will return to the pier, passing through the scenic fishing village of Petty Harbour.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 90-minutes of easy to moderate walking that includes navigating wooden boardwalks, slopes, stairs and uneven surfaces. Access to the lighthouse involves walking 180 steps. The tour is not available to wheelchair guests and those with mobility concerns are cautioned to carefully evaluate their personal level of stamina and ability. Weather appropriate layered clothing; sun cap; sunglasses; and flat, comfortable walking shoes are recommended. No restrooms are available at Cape Spear Historic Site. Tour coaches have restrooms.

    Read More
  • Galapagos of Geology

    See firsthand why Newfoundland is called the “Galapagos of Geology” by visiting its most geologically significant sites, including a museum that reveals how the landscape was created.

    After departing from the pier, you will drive to nearby Fort Amherst, a hilly promontory that presents a commanding view of the entrance to St. John’s harbor. Although the British built a fort here in the late 18th century, no ruins remain. Even so, the area has been deemed a National Historic site because of its long-stranding strategic importance. It’s significant geologically because from the hilltop you can easily make out an ancient fault line.

    Another panoramic vista awaits you at nearby Signal Hill, where signal flags were once flown to announce the names of approaching ships. It was also here in 1901 that Guglielmo Marconi received the first transatlantic wireless signal. While strolling the hill’s boardwalks, you will learn the military history of this strategic site and discover more about the formation of the rocky coastline.

    Then, for the ultimate immersion into Newfoundland’s unique geology, you will browse the exhibits in the Johnson Geo Centre. You may see fossils from the floor of the sea, some of the Earth’s oldest rocks, and a geological timetable that may explain how the Earth was formed. There is also an enlightening display that replicates an oil platform to show how this fossil fuel is extracted from the ground. Following your visit, you will return to the pier.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 2 1/2 hours of easy to moderate walking that includes navigating wooden boardwalks, slopes, stairs and uneven surfaces. The tour is not available to wheelchair guests and those with mobility concerns are cautioned to carefully evaluate their personal level of stamina and ability. Weather appropriate layered clothing; sun cap; sunglasses; and flat, comfortable walking shoes are recommended.

    Read More
  • Puffin-Watching Adventure

    Cruise the pristine waters off Newfoundland looking for Atlantic puffins, which may number up to a half-million, and then stand on the easternmost point in North America.

    After departing from the pier, you will enjoy a leisurely drive south to the engaging fishing community of Bay Bulls. From here, you will board a boat for a picturesque cruise along the dramatic coastline, where you are sure to see wildlife and perhaps even an iceberg.

    Atlantic puffins thrive in these waters. A staggeringly high 95% of all of North America’s puffins breed around the Newfoundland and Labrador coasts, and they are magnificent to watch. Often called “sea parrots,” puffins spend most of their lives on the water, either diving up to 200 feet deep for food or resting on the waves when not swimming.

    They are also skilled flyers, reaching speeds up to 55 miles per mile, which is surprising in light of their rather stout appearance. Puffins are easy to spot because their beaks turn bright orange this time of the year, most likely to attract mates.

    These waters are also home to the world’s largest population of humpback whales, which often breach the surface in a magnificent display of their power and majesty. Also, keep an eye out for frolicking dolphins and seabirds such as gannets and storm petrels.

    After disembarking, you will drive thru the scenic fishing community of Petty Harbour. A brief stop will be made for photographic opportunites and to enjoy the dramatic views. Return to the ship via historic downtown.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 45 minutes of easy to moderate walking at Cape Spear. Access to the lighthouse involves walking 180 steps. The tour is not available to wheelchair guests and those with mobility concerns are cautioned to carefully evaluate their personal level of stamina and ability. Persons who suffer from motion sickness should take the necessary precautions before beginning the tour. The tour boat has both inside and outside seating. Warm, layered clothing; sun cap; sunglasses; and flat, comfortable walking shoes are recommended. Wildlife sightings, while likely, are not guaranteed. No restrooms are available at Cape Spear Historic Site. Tour coaches have restrooms.

    Read More
  • St. John's Coastal Hike

    Starting from the top of the National Historic Site of Signal Hill, you will hike along the stunningly beautiful coastline, eventually ending up in St. John’s for a berry wine tasting.

    After departing from the pier, you will enjoy a brief drive through St. John’s to Signal Hill, where signal flags were once flown to announce the names of approaching ships. It was also here in 1901 that Guglielmo Marconi received the first transatlantic wireless signal. While walking the hill’s boardwalks, you will learn about the military history of this strategic site, and enjoy magnificent views of sights such as your ship in the harbor below.

    Your descent from Signal Hill will be on foot down North Head Trail, a winding path that follows the edge of the bluff in parts. It’s well worth the effort as the views of the sea and surrounding landscape are absolutely breathtaking. Expect to see wildflowers, seabirds, and fishing trawlers cruising through the Narrows, the aptly named channel to the harbor.

    In time, you will arrive in St. John’s and make your way to Water Street, which is thought to be the oldest street in North America. It’s now lined with historical shops, restaurants and galleries, one of which you will stop in for a wine tasting. The exact selection of berry wines will be determined at the gallery, but they could be produced from blueberries, raspberries or even cloudberries. Afterwards, you will make the short walk back to the pier.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 2-hours of moderate to strenuous walking that includes uneven and rocky surfaces. The tour is not available to wheelchair guests or those with walking difficulties and not recommended for anyone that suffers from vertigo. Participants should be in good physical condition. Travel to the trail head will be either by van or local school bus. Warm, layered clothing; sun cap; sunglasses; and flat, comfortable, closed walking shoes are recommended. Sandals and flip-flops are not permitted. The minimum age to participate is 12 years old.

    Read More
Allow us to take care of every detail.
Back to top