Explore Kahalui Maui, on Hawaii’s Valley Island with its natural treasures on land and sea including Mt. Haleakala Crater, Iao Park Needle Mountain, and spectacular beaches for swimming, diving and surfing. Head to Lahaina on the westward side of the island and visit the magnificent world-famous banyan tree in front of the Old Courthouse building. Browse mile-long Front Street with its shops, galleries, whaling history museum, and restaurants. Stop for a refreshing shave ice. Look for unique souvenirs like Maui’s famous “Kitchen Cooked” potato chips, coffee, and leis. Back in Kahalui visit the Maui Arts and Cultural Center. Enjoy a meal of Hawaiian pig, poi, or fresh seafood in this lush and naturally luxurious tropical settings.

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  • Haleakala Crater

    Treat yourself to Maui's most spectacular view from the overlook at Haleakala Crater, the world's largest dormant volcano and the centerpiece of the sprawling national park at its feet.

    Joining your coach at the pier, you'll commence the majestic drive inland to Haleakala National Park in eastern Maui. This protected wilderness of nearly 25,000 acres is absolutely spectacular, and you'll see it from atop the Haleakala Crater overlook. Rising more than 10,000 feet above sea level, the crater is a "wahi pana," meaning a legendary place. Legend has it that it was from here that the demi-god Maui pulled the Hawaiian Islands out of the ocean with a fishhook and line. Always considered sacred, Haleakala was never permanently inhabited. Rather, native Hawaiians came to honor the gods, hunt birds for feathers and food, and quarry the basalt volcanic rock for tools such as the ax-like adz.

    While Haleakala is considered an active volcano, it hasn't erupted since 1790 or perhaps even before, and it is in all actuality dormant. Haleakala measures a staggering 33 miles wide by 24 miles long, and the views from the scenic overlook are simply stunning. The inside of the crater is so deep that four Empire State Buildings could be stacked end to end and still not reach the top. Later, as you travel back down the mountainside and make your way back to the pier, be sure to notice the dramatic differences in the plant life and terrain as you descend back to sea level.

    Please note: This tour is mostly panoramic with a limited amount of walking/standing at the scenic overlook. The tour is available to wheelchair guests who have a collapsible wheelchair, can make their own way on and off the coach and have a companion to assist them. Those with mobility concerns are cautioned to carefully evaluate their personal level of stamina and ability. Additionally, this tour is not recommended for those with heart or respiratory conditions as elevation at the summit reaches 10,000 feet. Layered, casual clothing; a light jacket (conditions can be cool at the summit of Haleakala), and flat, comfortable walking shoes are suggested.

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  • Atlantis Submarine Adventure

    Behold the awe-inspiring undersea world without even getting wet, by boarding a submarine and heading to a reef teeming with marine life.

    From the pier in Kahului, it's a 1-hour drive to Lahaina where you will find the Atlantis shuttle boat and step aboard. While cruising to the dive site just two miles offshore, enjoy your unique perspective of Maui's breathtaking coast. From November to April you may even see a whale breaching, as they migrate to these waters during that time.

    At the dive site, you will board the submarine, a technologically advanced air-conditioned vessel that's exceedingly comfortable. It stretches over 65 feet and is equipped with large viewing windows for maximum visibility. Descending through the crystal-clear water, a fascinating world comes into view. Brightly colored exotic fish, moray eels and all sorts of other indigenous species flourish here, and the sights are constantly changing as you cruise along.

    After a bit, you will come upon the Brig Carthaginian, a replica of a 19th-century supply vessel. It was intentionally sunk here several years ago and now lies at a depth of 95 feet, where it serves as an artificial reef that attracts countless marine creatures. It's one of the best viewing spots off of Maui, so expect to be mesmerized as your submarine cruises around the ship.

    At the conclusion of your submarine ride, you will re-board the Atlantis shuttle boat and motor back to the pier in Lahaina where you will have some free time in this charming town. Lahaina was Hawaii's capital in the early 19th century and was also a booming whaling village in the mid-1800s, an era described by Herman Melville in his classic "Moby Dick." You might want to spend your time in the city's historic district, visiting art galleries, or dining on regional Hawaiian cuisine. Wherever you wander, Lahaina's bustling Front Street makes for a wonderful starting point. Afterwards, you'll rejoin your coach and transfer back to the pier in Kahului.

    Please note: There is a very limited amount of walking on this tour; however, participants must be able to negotiate a nearly vertical 7-step ladder without assistance to enter and exit the submarine. The tour is not available to wheelchair guests and is not considered suitable for those with mobility concerns. Casual clothing and flat, comfortable walking shoes are suggested. Participants must be at least 3-feet tall in order to take part in this tour.

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  • Zodiac Whale Watching Adventure

    Cruise through the National Humpback Whale Marine Sanctuary in a Zodiac, a vessel that is ideal for speedy maneuvering and up-close viewing of marine creatures.

    After departing from the pier, you will enjoy a scenic ride across the neck of Maui to lovely Maalaea Bay on the island’s southern shore. Here, you’ll board a Zodiac vessel that can navigate into areas other vessels can’t, offering you a close-up view of the marine life.

    You will be cruising into the National Humpback Whale Marine Sanctuary. It is one of the favorite mating and birthing grounds for humpbacks because of the water’s ideal temperature and depth and the scarcity of killer whales, which are the young humpbacks’ most feared natural predators.

    As you zip through the water, you can expect to see humpback whales putting on a spectacular show of breaching the surface, tail and fin slapping, and spy hopping, where only the whale’s head pops out of the water. The males are known for their singing as part of the mating ritual. Humpback whales come to Maalaea Bay each year to breed after a month or so of migrating from their feeding grounds in Alaska, nearly 3,500 miles away.

    To enhance the whale-watching experience, a naturalist will be onboard explaining the whales’ behavior during this time of the year. Feel free to ask questions during the two hours or so spent on the water, after which you will return to Kahului.

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  • Panoramic Maui & Lahaina On Your Own

    This wonderful jaunt into Maui's western countryside highlights the Iao Valley and iconic, volcanic Iao Needle, while leaving plenty of time afterwards to explore the town of Lahaina on your own.

    Traveling by coach from the pier, you'll enjoy a scenic drive along lovely Kahului Bay to nearby Iao Valley State Park. The Hawaiian word "Iao" means "cloud supreme," a reference to the white puffs of clouds that often linger about the valley, bringing rain and nourishing the tropical landscape. In 1790, King Kamehameha I defeated an opposing army here in the ferocious Battle of Kepaniwai, eventually uniting the Hawaiian Islands. Today, the deep, lush valley is better known for the Iao Needle, a volcanic rock pinnacle that soars 1,200 feet above the dense rainforest covering the valley floor. The green-mantled needle served as a lookout point for Kamehameha's troops, and you can get a closer view of this icon by following the paved walking path to its base.

    After completing your scenic loop of Iao Valley, you will travel to the quaint town of Lahaina where you will be afforded approximately 2 1/2 hours of free time. Lahaina was Hawaii's capital in the early 19th century and was also a booming whaling village in the mid-1800s, an era described by Herman Melville in his classic "Moby Dick." You might want to spend your time in the city's historic district, visiting art galleries, or dining on regional Hawaiian cuisine. Wherever you wander, Lahaina's bustling Front Street makes for a wonderful starting point.

    At the conclusion of your free time, you will re-board your coach and travel back to the pier in Kahului.

    Please note: There is a limited amount of walking on this tour at the Iao Valley to get a better of view of the Iao Needle; however, this is optional. Additional walking is at the guests' discretion during the free time in Lahaina. The tour is available to wheelchair guests who have a collapsible wheelchair, can make their own way on and off the coach and have a companion to assist them. Those with mobility concerns are cautioned to carefully evaluate their personal level of stamina and ability. Casual clothing; sun cap; sunglasses; and flat, comfortable walking shoes are suggested.

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  • Mauis North Shore and Waterfalls

    Enjoy an enlightening and delightful tour through northern Maui, enjoying attractions as diverse as a premier surfing beach, an arts center and a majestic waterfall in the rain forest.

    After departing from the pier, you will take in the highlights on the island’s spectacular north shore, beginning with beautiful Ho’okipa Beach Park. Some of the best waves in Hawaii are found here and while pausing for photos, you can expect to see surfers riding the waves. The ideal conditions have attracted surfers for so long that Hookipa is considered the birthplace of modern surfing.

    The visual attractions continue inland at the Hui No’eau Visual Arts Center, where some of Maui’s most creative artists display their works. The exhibitions constantly change but usually include paintings, sculptures and photography. You will have time to browse the galleries, purchase artwork and picnic on the grounds before heading to Makawao.

    Hawaiian cowboys known as paniolo have wrangled cattle in the open plains near town since the 19th century. Today Makawao is known more as a thriving arts community. While meandering about, feel free to browse the eclectic shops and enjoy the laid-back ambiance.

    Maui’s artists often visit Ho’olawa Valley for inspiration and you will soon understand why by taking a nature walk with a leading naturalist. Your destination will be an idyllic waterfall in the rainforest, and along the way you will learn about the valley’s indigenous flora and fauna. To complement the experience, you will enjoy a tasting of fresh exotic fruits.

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  • Best of West Maui

    Featuring the art and traditional ways of the Hawaiians, this limited participation tour stops in a gallery solely for Hawaiian artists and in an isolated village where ancient customs are practiced.

    Travel from the pier on one of the island's most scenic highways as it makes its way around the West Maui Mountains to the Kaukini Gallery located in the remote Kahakuloa Valley. Here, at this charming gallery which only displays the work of Hawaiian artists, you'll see everything from original oil paintings to rocking chairs made from Hawaiian Koa wood to handcrafted jewelry and colorful ceramics. More than 100 artists are represented at the gallery, so there's a good chance you will find a piece that will capture your interest and perhaps take home as a lasting memento of your visit.

    Continuing on, you'll explore more of the valley, including Kahakuloa Village. The villagers hold Hawaiian traditions very close to their heart, and the rather isolated area is known for its reverence for ancient customs. The few families living here grow the Hawaiian staple of taro in the surrounding fields, which you may tour. There are no gas stations or restaurants, only a few churches and roadside stands. This is Hawaii as it was centuries ago, a secluded paradise where nature, not man, reigns supreme. While in the village, your guide will explain how the area was settled 1,500 years ago and the traditional Hawaiian farming techniques that are still used today.

    Following your visit in the village, your panoramic tour will resume, making two more photo stops, first at Ohai Cliffs overlook for sweeping views of dramatic cliffs and the ocean, then at the most northern area of Maui-- surreal Nakalele Point, where a blowhole emits tall geysers of sea water. Next you will drive to Honolua Bay, renowned for surfing and snorkeling. Another photo stop will be made here before continuing your drive along Maui’s west-side coastline with its resorts and sandy beaches. Heading inland, you'll reach the mountainous interior and the great historical valley of ‘Iao. Here, you'll be treated to lunch at the Bailey House Museum, an 1833 historical mission house with both Hawaiian and missionary artifacts and antiques, complete with a gift and book shop. Following lunch, you'll travel deeper into the valley to see the gardens, streams and dramatic canyon walls of Iao Valley State Park before finally returning to the cruise ship pier.

    Please note: This tour includes just over 1-hour of walking and covers approximately 1 mile in distance. In Kahakuloa, there will be some steps to negotiate to travel across a swinging bridge. The terrain is uneven and can be slippery. The tour is not available to wheelchair guests or those with mobility concerns. Casual clothing; sun cap; sunglasses; sunscreen; and flat, comfortable walking shoes with a non-slip sole are recommended. Lunch venue is subject to change.

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  • Hana Picnic

    Savor the sights along the circuitous, wonderfully scenic Hana Highway, stopping to stroll through a tropical garden, swim in a rainforest pool, and enjoy lunch at the beach.

    Depart from the pier in a limo-van with comfortable captain’s-chair seating and drive east along Maui’s gorgeous Hana Highway. This famed stretch of roadway winds along the precipitous coastline, delivering some of the most phenomenal vistas in Hawaii. Along the way, you will see black-sand beaches, plunging waterfalls, and luxuriant bamboo jungles.

    Pausing at the Ke’anae Peninsula, you will look out over fields of taro, long a staple in Hawaii and the source of poi. Another brief stop takes you to a tropical garden for a look at Hawaii’s lush indigenous flora, including hala, which is used for baskets, and loulu, a plant with leaves that are ideal for thatching the roofs of traditional homes.

    A tasty lunch of Pacific Rim favorites on the beach in Hana follows, after which you will have time to stroll the coast, sunbathe or do nothing more ambitious than relaxing in the shade of a palm. Afterwards, you will explore idyllic Pua’a Ka’a State Park, where you might swim in a freshwater pool under a gently cascading waterfall.

    Then, it’s back onto the Hana Highway for a leisurely return drive to the pier, passing one breathtaking vista after another, including the windsurfing paradise of Ho’okipa Beach.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 90-minutes of easy to moderate walking/standing. The tour is not available to wheelchair guests and those with mobility concerns are cautioned to carefully evaluate their personal level of stamina and ability. Casual clothing with a light jacket or cover-up (there can be changing weather conditions); sun cap; sunglasses; sunscreen; and flat, comfortable walking shoes are recommended. Those who wish to swim should bring along a swimsuit, a towel from the ship and optional aqua socks. Those who participate in any water activities do so at their own risk and responsibility.

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  • Iao Valley & Maui Ocean Center

    Explore the natural paradise of legendary Iao Valley and the remarkable Maui Ocean Center, the Western Hemisphere's largest tropical aquarium.

    Depart from the pier and before long you will be engulfed by the outrageously beautiful West Maui Mountains. Their bio-diversity is extraordinarily rich, even by Hawaii's elevated standards. The jungle-like scenery is equally dramatic upon entering the Iao Valley State Park, the site of a battle that changed the course of Hawaii's history. It was here that King Kamehameha I defeated Kalaikupule and united the Hawaiian Islands. The park's iconic landmark and focal point is Iao Needle, a green-mantled rock outcropping that soars into the air.

    After approximately 45-minutes exploring the park, you will drive south to the Maui Ocean Center in Ma'alaea Village for a self-guided visit. The center's diversity of marine life, all of which has been collected around the Hawaiian Islands, is absolutely phenomenal. See America's largest live coral display, enigmatic Pacific Blue Marlin, highly toxic Pufferfish, frolicking seals and green sea turtles, many of which were born in the aquarium but will be released into the ocean after they grow and gain strength. There are more than 60 interactive habitat exhibits, which provide an unrivalled aquatic experience.

    Following your tour of the Maui Ocean Center, you will rejoin your coach for the transfer back to the pier.

    Please note: There is approximately 2 1/2 hours of easy to moderate walking on this tour. There is a short, paved loop trail at Iao Valley to view the needle but guests may stay with the coach if they choose. The tour is available to wheelchair guests who have a collapsible wheelchair, can make their own way on and off the coach and have a companion to assist them. Those with mobility concerns are cautioned to evaluate their personal level of stamina and ability. Casual clothing and flat, comfortable walking shoes are suggested.

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  • Molokini Zodiac Turtle Snorkel

    Snorkel in the crystal-clear waters off Maui’s south shore, where you will find coral reefs teeming with tropical fish and an area just off the beach known for its many sea turtles.

    After departing from the pier, you will enjoy a scenic ride across the neck of Maui to lovely Maalaea Bay on the island’s southern shore. Here, you’ll board a Zodiac vessel that is ideal for navigating into areas such as Molokini Crater, a snorkeling paradise.

    Geologists believe that the crater was formed following a volcanic eruption about 230,000 years ago and soon filled with seawater. The crescent-shaped crater and surrounding 77 acres have since been deemed a protected Marine Life Conservation District and Bird Sanctuary, and wildlife is abundant below and above the water’s surface.

    While snorkeling along the crater’s coral reefs, you can expect to see brightly colored Picasso triggerfish, yellow tang, parrot fish and Moorish idol. The white spotted puffer is another common species that is easily recognized, especially if it feels threatened and puffs up.

    Sea birds including the Bulwer’s petrel and wedge-tailed shearwater can usually be seen feeding on the surface. Amazingly, the shearwater is also capable of reaching depths of more than 200 feet to feed.

    More wildlife awaits you at nearby Turtle Town, an area just off Maluaka Beach that supports an enormous population of Hawaiian green sea turtles. Known locally as “honu,” these slow-moving, graceful creatures are spectacular to watch, especially as they feed on algae close to the shore.

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  • Maui Pineapple Tour

    It’s all about Hawaii’s iconic pineapple on this enlightening tour of a working plantation that grows, cultivates, packs and ships these juicy, extra-sweet fruits throughout the world.

    Depart from the pier and drive inland to the agricultural village of Hali’imaile, where you will be treated to an exclusive tour of one of Hawaii’s most esteemed pineapple plantations. Although a well-recognized symbol of Hawaii, the pineapple isn’t native to the state. In fact, the fruit wasn’t introduced until the early 1800s. But by the end of the century, production soared and today the pineapple is synonymous with Hawaii.

    During your entertaining exploration of this working plantation, you will delve into the history of the pineapple, behold seemingly endless fields of the crop, and get an insider’s look at how the fruit is processed and packaged. Your guide, who is also a plantation worker, will fresh-pick some pineapples off the plants and slice them open so you can taste the lusciously juicy fruit that’s lies inside. Expect it to taste noticeably different from the pineapples you buy in the grocery store. Pineapples only remain ripe in the fields during a three-day window, and your guide will select the ones that are at their peak of flavor.

    A relaxing lunch at a nearby restaurant follows, featuring a variety of Hawaiian dishes made with pineapple and other locally grown fruits and vegetables. Afterwards, you will drive back to the pier.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 1-hour of easy to moderate walking/standing over some natural surfaces and there will be driving over uneven and unpaved terrain in the pineapple fields. The tour is not available to wheelchair guests and not recommended for those with back or neck problems. Guests with mobility concerns are cautioned to carefully evaluate their personal level of stamina and ability. Weather appropriate casual clothing; sun cap; sunglasses; sunscreen; and flat, comfortable walking shoes are recommended.

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  • Road to Hana Deluxe

    Sit back and appreciate all of the sights along the famed Hana Highway without having to navigate the curves yourself. Travel over bridges and along the twisting road in the air-conditioned comfort of an exclusive 8-passenger luxury limo-van.

    Enjoy pastries and beverages at either Ho'okipa or Kaumanhina where your journey to Hana begins. Then relax and take in the incredible scenery of lava cliffs, tumbling waterfalls, lush hillsides of feathery ferns, and trees laden with tropical fruit. You’ll have plenty of photo opportunities and time to explore at a leisurely pace, with many stops made along this spectacular coastal drive.

    Investigate the Keanae Peninsula, one of the last enclaves of native Hawaiians. Here tranquil taro fields and Waikani Falls, a cascade of fresh mountain rainwater, are just some of the sights for you to enjoy. It’s also the perfect place for you to learn about the native Hawaiian people, their culture and the land they call home.

    Lunch is included, and there is time for you to stroll, swim, sunbathe or just relax. Bring your swimsuit and a towel and take a dip in a crystal clear, freshwater pool under a cascading waterfall – a perfect “Heavenly Hana” experience. The return journey takes you to Hookipa and the chance to snap a breathtaking photo of Maui's world-class windsurfers.

    Note: Participants must be at least 6 years of age. Not recommended for guests prone to motion sickness.

    This tour is not available for walkers, wheelchairs, scooters, strollers or crutches. "Flip-flops", open toe sandals are not allowed.

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  • Rainforest Waterfall Hike

    After driving through some of Maui's most spectacular countryside, you will get to experience it up-close by hiking into an exotic rainforest dotted with waterfalls.

    Leaving from the pier, you will first travel along Maui's magnificent coastline, through the isthmus and then follow the Hana Highway. Stunning hardly begins to describe the landscape. The highway is not only a National Millennium Legacy Trail, but it also has been added to the National Register of Historic Places. It's narrow, winding and incredibly scenic, a perfect introduction to Ho'olawa Valley.

    Upon arrival, you will enjoy of round-trip hike of approximately 2 1/2 miles along a trail that parallels several streams and then enters a dense rainforest. The variety of species is outstanding as you walk among majestic trees, stands of bamboo and past vibrant flowers flourishing in their natural habitat. Several waterfalls of heights up to 40 feet beckon you to take a refreshing swim in their large pools, so be sure to wear your swimsuit under your hiking clothes. At one of these marvelous waterfall locations, you will be provided with a light lunch consisting of fruit and a sandwich.

    Your guides are exceedingly knowledgeable and will happily tell you about Maui's history, geology, and botany. Depending on the time of year, guides may offer you wild fruits and herbs picked along the trail. You might even condition your hair with the liquid found within the flower of a Giant Shampoo Ginger (Awapuhi).

    Following approximately 3 1/2 hours exploring this glorious environment, you will re-board your coach and make the return journey to the pier in Kahului.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 2 1/2 miles of moderate hiking that includes a few steep areas that require participants to use their hands to negotiate. Guests should be in good physical condition. The tour is not available to wheelchair guests or those with mobility concerns. Guests should wear swimsuits under comfortable clothing; sun caps; sunglasses; sunscreen and flat hiking or athletic shoes along with bringing a towel. Rainwear, backpacks, insect repellant and special traction water shoes will be provided. All guides are certified in CPR, first-aid and water safety. Minimum age to participate is 6 years old and persons under the age of 18 must be accompanied by an adult parent or guardian. A liability waiver is required to participate in this tour.

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