Nagasaki is the capital and largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture in Japan. It was a center of European influence in feudal Japan from first contact through the isolationist era until the opening of Japan and the modernization of Japan during the Meiji Restoration. It became a major Imperial Japanese Navy base during the First Sino-Japanese War and Russo-Japanese War. The city became the second city in the world to be bombed by a nuclear weapon, following Hiroshima.

Port: Nagasaki
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Nagasaki

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  • Panoramic Nagasaki

    Explore Nagasaki's turbulent past and striking beauty during an orientation tour of this panoramic city.

    Depart the pier for the scenic drive to Inasayama Hill, and a visit to the Inasayama Natural Park. Inasayama Hill is renowned for its spectacular sunset and nighttime views. Weather permitting, you will take in panoramic views and photo opportunities of Unzen, Amakusa and Gotoh Islands.

    You will then continue on to Peace Park, dedicated to world peace. This 376,000 square-foot park features a large fountain, and different statues and sculptures donated by various countries and artists around the world in the name of peace. The main statue is nearly 33 feet tall, and was constructed in Nagasaki. It depicts a man with one arm raised to the sky to indicate the threat of nuclear destruction, and the other arm held horizontally in a gesture of peace. The man's eyelids are closed in anguished prayer for those who perished in the bombing.

    Next, you will proceed for a visit to Uragami Cathedral, formerly the largest cathedral in the East until it was destroyed by the atomic bomb. You will view Dejima, an artificial island built in 1636 AD in the Port of Nagasaki to house Japan's Portuguese residents. Today, Dejima is no longer an island, as the surrounding area was reclaimed during the 20th century. However, a number of Dejima's historical structures remain, or are being reconstructed in the area.

    Your tour concludes with a drive past Chinatown before returning to the pier and ship.

    Please note: This tour has been specially created for our guests with walking difficulties. The tour includes one photo stop, and one comfort stop; the remainder of the tour will be spent on the coach. Each guest will have a window seat on the coach to maximize the quality of sightseeing.

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  • Nagasaki Museum of History and Culture

    Explore Japan's cultural, economic and trading past during this memorable visit to the Nagasaki Museum of History and Culture.

    Depart the pier for the drive into Nagasaki. Japan closed international trading during the Edo Period, a period of national isolation that lasted from the 17th to 19th century. Nagasaki became the only port to open its windows to overseas trade in Western Japan.

    Upon arrival in Nagasaki, you will proceed for a visit to the Nagasaki Museum of History and Culture. The museum has two sections: the History and Culture Exhibition Zone and the Japanese Government of Nagasaki Zone. During your visit, you will learn about the history of foreign trading in Japan, and view many historical arts and crafts during that period. You will also have an opportunity to explore the life, culture and administration during the era of samurai warriors in Nagasaki.

    Following your tour, you will re-board your coach for the return drive to the pier.

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  • Nagasaki Peace Park

    Experience the stunning beauty and somber legacy of Nagasaki during this visit to the historic Peace Park.

    Depart the pier for Nagasaki Peace Park, built to commemorate the exact spot of the atomic explosion at 11:02 a.m. on August 9, 1945. Upon arrival, you will view the park's beautiful bronze Peace Statue. This unique male figure is dedicated to peace, measures nearly 33 feet in height and rests on a 12-foot-tall pedestal. Numerous photographs and relics of the atomic bombing are preserved in this park.

    Following your visit, you will rejoin your coach and pass by the 26 Martyrs of Japan and Dejima before commencing your return drive to the pier.

    Please note: This tour involves approximately 1 hour of walking at the Peace Park.

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  • Nordic Walk and Special Lunch At Buddhist Temple

    Work up an appetite Nordic walking on Iojima Island and then dine on a vegetarian meal prepared by monks in a manner that reflects the pure way of Buddha.

    After departing from the pier, you will soon cross the bridge leading to Iojima, the only town on the naturally beautiful island of the same name. Iojima island provides an excellent setting for Nordic walking, a total-body exercise with multiple health benefits.

    Following a little instruction and a brief warm-up to stretch your legs, you will begin walking around the island. To help maintain stability and good posture, you will walk using specially designed Nordic poles similar to ski poles.

    The poles work the upper body through a full range of motion, so you will get a better workout without feeling like you’re working any harder. When done properly—and it’s easy—Nordic walking can relieve neck and shoulder tension and tone upper-body muscles.

    Having worked up an appetite, you will then head for nearby Kofukuji Temple for lunch. The Zen Buddhist temple practices a style of vegetarian cooking known as Fucha royri, which Chinese monks introduced to Japan about 300 years ago during the Edo Period.

    You will dine sitting on a tatami mat and be served traditional vegetarian dishes such as sesame tofu and mock eel, an entrée of mashed vegetables that resembles eel. The preparation of the dishes enhances the purity and freshness of the ingredients, a difference you will certainly taste.

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  • The Splendor of Arita & Nagasaki

    This full day excursion will take you to Arita, a scenic two-hour drive from Nagasaki and known throughout the world as the birthplace of magnificent Japanese ceramics.

    In 1604, Japanese warlords from the Arita area invaded Korea, bringing back something quite precious: Korean potters skilled in creating fine white porcelain. The pottery FUKAGAWA-SEIJI has approximate 120 years history, and has been sticking to hand techniques for all porcelain productions. "The almost transparent white porcelain" produced by only being baked at high temperature and "Unique design" fascinate porcelain lovers all over the world. FUKAGAWA-SEIJI was appointed as Japanese Imperial Household Agency with high evaluation, not only Japan but also Europe. Many suitable items are assorted as souvenir.

    After you enjoy your visit to Fukagawa Seiji Gallery Park and lunch at a local restaurant, you will be transferred to the old town and enjoy free time around the square. There are many small Pottery galleries and shops in this area so you will have another chance to purchase unique pottery.

    Your last visit, back in Nagasaki, is to the beautifully serene Nagasaki Peace Park, located a few minutes’ walk from the epicenter of the atomic bomb blast of August 1945. Return to the pier and re-board the ship.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 2.5 hours of walking with a limited number of steps to negotiate. This tour is not available to wheelchair guests and those with mobility concerns are cautioned to carefully evaluate their personal level of stamina and ability. Casual clothing and comfortable, flat walking shoes are recommended. We suggest passengers obtain local currency for shopping. The order of sites visited may vary. On shorter port calls, the tour will be 6.5 hours and will visit Genemongama Pottery instead of Arita's old town.

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  • Highlights of Nagasaki

    Shaped like an amphitheater, with crooked streets and tiered houses clinging to the hillsides, Nagasaki is one of Japans most charming cities. Nagasaki natural beauty includes tempting hot spring resorts and the astounding presence of active volcanoes.

    Between 1639 and 1859, when Japan closed its doors to the world, the Tokugawa Shogunate (military government) kept Nagasaki open to limited foreign trade, making it the center for Western technology and science. Nagasaki became a major trading port when Japan fully reopened to the West in the 1850s.

    At first glance, the city appears to be very modern, having been rebuilt since 1945. However, your half-day exploration of the city will reveal a number of areas where old buildings, secluded gardens and temples remain.

    You will begin your tour with a visit to the somber Nagasaki Peace Park, commemorating the citys destruction by the plutonium bomb dropped on August 9, 1945. Although Fat Man, the name given to the second bomb dropped on Japan, missed its target by over a mile and a half, it leveled nearly half the city. The parks main attraction is its collection of statues and sculptures donated by countries and groups all over the world. This includes the massive Peace Memorial Statue depicting a man with his right arm pointing to the sky to indicate the continued threat of nuclear destruction. Visit the Atomic Bomb Museum, with over 900 artifacts indicative of the citys devastation, as well as displays on modern nuclear technology and concerns.

    At the conclusion of your tour you will return to the pier.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 2.5 hours of walking with a limited number of steps to negotiate. Those guests with mobility concerns are cautioned to evaluate their personal level of ability and stamina. Casual clothing and comfortable, flat walking shoes are recommended. This tour includes sensitive material including graphic pictures and displays on the atrocities of war. We suggest passengers obtain local currency for shopping.

    The order of sites visited may vary.

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  • Panoramic Nagasaki

    Your tour begins with a scenic drive to Inasayama lookout point, located on Inasayama hill, a famous spot of beautiful sunset and night view.

    Continue to the Nagasaki Peace Park, dedicated to world peace. The park is 35,000 square meters in size and contains a large fountain and different statues and sculptures donated in the name of peace from various countries and artists around the world. The main statue is ten meters tall and was constructed by Nagasaki City. It depicts a man with one arm raised to the sky to indicate the threat of nuclear destruction and the other arm held horizontally in a gesture of peace. The man's eyelids are closed in anguished prayer for those who perished in the bombing.

    Next, continue your drive and see Uragami Cathedral, which was the largest cathedral in the East until it was destroyed by the atomic bomb blast. View Dejima, an artificial island in the port of Nagasaki, completed in 1636 to house Japan's Portuguese residents. Today, Dejima is not an island anymore, as the surrounding area has also been reclaimed during the 20th century. However, a number of Dejima's historical structures remain or are being reconstructed in the area. Among the attractions are the Dejima Historical Museum and a miniature model of the former island. Return to the pier and re-board the ship.

    Please note: This tour is available to wheelchair guests who have a collapsible wheelchair and are able to make their own way on and off transportation. Guests must be self-sufficient or if assistance is required, they should travel with a companion who can provide this.

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  • Best of Nagasaki

    Delve into the culture and history of Nagasaki by visiting two museums and a park that reveal the effects of the 1945 atomic blast and the isolationist Edo period.

    After departing from the pier, you will soon arrive at the Atomic Bomb Museum, a sobering reminder of the devastation from the atomic bomb that was dropped on Nagasaki in 1945. The end of World War II soon followed.

    As you browse the displays, you will learn about the city’s culture before the bomb struck and the aftermath of the atomic blast. You can expect to see photographs of the widespread destruction to buildings such as the Urakami Cathedral and neighborhoods that were reduced to ruins. The museum’s goal is to candidly show the devastation from the atomic bomb in hopes that nuclear weapons will eventually be abolished.

    It is only fitting that you will next visit the Peace Memorial Park, an urban greenspace built near Ground Zero of the atomic blast. The inspiring park and the statue at its center were constructed to represent Nagasaki’s wish for world peace and the hope that a conflict of the magnitude of World War II never occurs again.

    For a different perspective of Nagasaki’s past, you will tour an historical museum on Dejima, an artificial island built hundreds of years ago to isolate Portuguese missionaries. Through enlightening documents, artwork and restored buildings, the museum shows what life was like during this cultural period. After visiting, you will return to the pier.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 3 hours of easy to moderate walking/standing. There will be a few steps to negotiate. The tour is available to wheelchair guests who have a collapsible wheelchair, are able to make their own way on and off the coach, and have an able-bodied companion to assist them. Those with mobility concerns are cautioned to carefully evaluate their personal level of stamina and ability. Weather appropriate clothing; sun cap; sunglasses; and flat, comfortable walking shoes are recommended. It is suggested guests bring local currency for any purchases ashore. The tour sequence may vary.

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  • A Visit to Unzen & Shimabara

    This scenic full-day tour will give you an opportunity to experience feudal Japan, and marvel at her amazing natural wonders. Begin with a scenic drive from Nagasaki to the Shimabara Peninsula, passing picturesque Ariake Bay. See Unzen Hell, a concentrated area of over thirty sulfur pits and natural steam vents that line the main road to Mt. Unzen, a highly active volcano chain on the Shimabara Peninsula. Easily located by its high dense clouds of ghostly, sulfurous steam, the hot springs of Unzen Hell were a favorite summer resort for European and American residents of Shanghai, Hong Kong and Manila during the 19th century. After lunch at a local restaurant, continue to Fugen Volcano, part of the Unzen chain. After remaining quiet for over 200 years, Fugen erupted in 1991, burying the small village of Mizunashihonjin and killing 48 people. Today, the ruins of the town are a memorial, where you see the remains of houses through the lava rock and mud. Continue with a stop at Shimabara, a city that flourished in the early 17th century after the construction of the Shimabara Castle. Take a guided tour of the meticulously restored castle, now a museum with displays of old swords, armor and other items from the Edo period, especially those related to the 1637 Shimabara Rebellion, an uprising of Christian peasantry. Following a tour of the castle, take a walking tour of old Shimabara town, with streets and houses preserved as they were hundreds of years ago. Visit a samurai village, where the ways of Japan's warrior class are recreated and kept alive. Reboarding your motorcoach, return to Nagasaki and the ship.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 3 hours of walking with a limited number of steps to negotiate. Those guests with mobility concerns are cautioned to evaluate their personal level of ability and stamina. Casual clothing and comfortable, flat walking shoes are recommended.

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  • Highlights of Unzen & Shimabara

    Stroll a boardwalk that winds through boiling geothermal springs known as Unzen Hell and then visit Shimabara castle, which a cruel feudal lord built in the 17th century.

    After departing from the pier, you will settle in for a wonderfully picturesque drive through the countryside to Unzen Hell, a natural hot springs formed by a magma reservoir at the bottom of a nearby bay. As you stroll along the boardwalk through the steaming, hissing landscape, it becomes obvious how the boiling geothermal springs acquired its name.

    Unzen Hell is of geological and historical interest. Here, between 1627-1632, dozens of Christians were tortured by being thrown into the boiling waters. Matsukura Shigemasa, the first lord of Shimabara domain, ordered the execution to suppress the spread of Christianity, which had been introduced to Japan about 100 years earlier. A plaque stands at Unzen Hell to commemorate the martyrs and the Christians that later rebelled against their persecution.

    Following lunch at a local restaurant, you will then visit Shimabara Castle, which Shigemasa built by raising taxes. The white-walled, five-tiered castle that stands today is a 1964 reproduction of the original, except for the stone foundation and moat.

    The museum inside the castle showcases the struggles of Japan’s early Christians and details the Shimabara Rebellion that followed. You may also see arms and items from the Christian uprising. After touring the imposing castle and lovely grounds dotted with cherry blossom trees, you will return to the pier.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 2 hours of moderate walking/standing. There will be gravel paths, cobblestone surfaces and a few steps to negotiate at Shimabara Castle. The tour is available to wheelchair guests who have a collapsible wheelchair, are able to make their own way on and off the coach, and have an able-bodied companion to assist them. Those with mobility concerns are cautioned to carefully evaluate their personal level of stamina and ability. Weather appropriate clothing; sun cap; sunglasses; and flat, comfortable walking shoes are recommended. It is suggested guests bring local currency for any purchases ashore. The tour sequence may vary.

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