Because it is the seat of the Japanese government and the home of the Imperial Family, Tokyo is the de facto capital of Japan. The firebombings of WWII in 1945, with 75,000 to 200,000 killed and half of the city destroyed, were almost as devastating as the atomic bombs of Hiroshima and Nagasaki combined. After the war, Tokyo was completely rebuilt. Today, Tokyo is one of the three world finance "command centers," along with New York and London.

Port: Tokyo
Experience

Tokyo

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  • Executive Collection Half Day Van

    PRICE is per vehicle

    This exclusive arrangement is designed to allow you the chance to customize your time ashore and discover the most interesting sights in the comfort and privacy of your own vehicle. With your private car and the personalized attention of your driver and English-speaking guide, you will have the flexibility and independence to design your itinerary ashore according to your own interests and sightsee at your own pace. See the most famous sights or go beyond to create your own intimate connections and unique cultural encounters.

    The Executive Collection is recommended for the single/solo traveler, couples, family, friends, and special interest groups traveling together. It can also be an excellent choice for physically challenged guests.

    Capacity: 6 guests

    PLEASE NOTE: Private cars/vans/minibuses are ordered per vehicle (not per person), and only one person in the party need order the vehicle. The price shown is the total cost for the vehicle, driver and English-speaking guide. Kindly note, however, that in certain ports only a driver/guide will be assigned (one person), due to limited availability. Entrance fees are not included in this price, in order to provide you with the most flexibility. In many ports, the number of vehicles available is extremely limited; therefore guests are encouraged to make their reservation as early as possible.

    Half-day private tours must depart between 8:00 a.m. and 9:00 am, or after 1:00 p.m.

    Upon embarkation, please consult the Destination Manager onboard to personally discuss your itinerary requirements and set your departure time.

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  • Tokyo Geisha Performance & Dinner

    "Spend a relaxing evening lingering over an authentic Japanese-style dinner, followed by a traditional geisha performance that lends great insight into Japanese culture.

    After departing from the pier, you will drive to a traditional restaurant in downtown Tokyo to enjoy a Kaiseki-style dinner. The hallmarks of this wonderfully sophisticated cuisine are its meticulous preparation and beautiful presentation. Each course is a work of art that beautifully blends delicate textures, flavors and colors.

    Kaiseki means “hot stone in a kimono fold,” an odd term for such an involved meal. It refers to the ancient custom of Zen priests tucking hot stones wrapped in towels next to their stomachs to alleviate hunger. Originally, kaiseki meals were simple and vegetarian, and they only later become elaborate affairs.

    Following this intricate, multi-course dining experience, you will be treated to a genuine geisha performance. In this elegant centuries-old art form, female entertainers dressed in colorful floor-length kimonos sing, dance and play traditional musical instruments such as a three-stringed Japanese lute. Geishas are highly trained performers who study a range of arts that may also include poetry, calligraphy and performing the tea ceremony. In the 1920s, there were about 80,000 geishas in Japan, but today there may be as few as a thousand, so this performance is a rare treat. Afterwards, you will return to the pier.

    Please note: This tour includes limited walking; however, participants are seated on the floor on a tatami mat. The tour is not available to wheelchair guests or those with mobility concerns. Comfortable clothing (women should not wear skirts or dresses); and flat, comfortable walking shoes are recommended. Shoes must be removed while in the restaurant. Minimum age to participate is 18 years old."

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  • Panoramic Tokyo

    Experience an unusual combination of religion and commerce during this scenic visit to the ancient city of Asakusa.

    Depart the pier for the scenic drive past the Imperial Palace, home of Japan's emperor, en route to Asakusa. Upon arrival, you will visit the Sensoji Temple. Tokyo's oldest temple, Sensoji was founded in the 7th century, and was well-established long before Tokugawa settled in Edo. Sensoji is dedicated to Kannon, the Buddhist Goddess of Mercy, and fondly known as the Asakusa Kannon Temple.

    Next, you will proceed for a visit to the Nakamise Shopping Street. This 820-foot approach to Sensoji Temple is one of Japan's oldest shopping streets. The arcade dates from the late 17th century, when local people were granted the special right to open shops that sold toys, sweets, snacks and souvenirs along the approach to the temple. The shopping street was destroyed during the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923, and during World War II air raids in 1945. Today, the bustling, colorful street resembles Old Edo, and its shops sell traditional knick-knacks, rice crackers and festival foods.

    Your tour concludes with some free time to browse the shops before rejoining the coach for the return drive to the pier.

    Please note: Credit cards are not accepted in most of the shops on the Nakamise Shopping Street. There are approximately 40 steps to negotiate at the entrance to the Sensoji Temple.

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  • Meiji Shrine and Tokyo Tower

    "See two Tokyo icons: a shrine dedicated to Japan’s first modern emperor and a soaring telecommunication tower that boldly announced the country’s rebirth after World War II.

    After departing from the pier, you will begin a scenic drive into the sprawling metropolis of Tokyo, an engaging capital city of more than 12 million people. Few places so reverently embrace their traditional past yet still celebrate everything new and exciting.

    Tokyo’s history will come alive as you arrive at Meiji Shrine, Tokyo’s most renowned Shinto shrine. It is dedicated to Emperor Meiji the Great, who reigned from 1867 to 1912 and transformed Japan from a feudal state into a world power. To enter the shrine, you will pass through a 40-foot-high Torii gate made of 1,500-year-old cypress. Unlike many other places of worship, the shrine is elegantly understated, even austere, imbuing it with a wonderful serenity. The surrounding 200-acre forested park adds to the peacefulness.

    Then for a change of pace, you will drive to Tokyo Tower, the second-highest structure in Japan. The colossal communication tower was erected in 1958 as a symbol of Japan’s rebirth and defines Tokyo’s skyline. With its iron-lattice construction it looks remarkably similar to the Eiffel Tower, although it’s painted orange and white to comply with aviation safety regulations. After riding an elevator to the tower’s nearly 500-foot-high Grand Observation Platform, you will be treated to an astounding view of the city. Afterwards, you will return to the pier.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 2 1/4 hours of moderate walking/standing and there will be some steps to negotiate. The tour is available to wheelchair guests who have a collapsible wheelchair (scooters are not permitted), are able to make their own way on and off the coach, and have an able bodied companion to assist them. Those with mobility concerns are cautioned to carefully evaluate their personal level of stamina and ability. Weather appropriate clothing; sun cap; sunglasses; and flat, comfortable walking shoes are recommended. The order of the sights viewed or visited may vary."

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  • Shopping: Modern and Traditional

    "Spend hours shopping in Tokyo’s most famous and diverse shopping districts, where you will find everything from traditional Japanese goods to the latest fashions, designer jewelry and high-end electronics.

    After departing from the pier, you will drive through the megalopolis of Tokyo to Asakusa Kannon (often called Senso-ji), the oldest temple in Tokyo. Founded in the 7th century, it is dedicated to Kannon, the Buddhist goddess of compassion.

    While Asakusa is known for the treasures inside, it is just as renowned for the dozens of ancient shops flanking Nakamise Street, the approach to its door. Here, you will find a variety of Japanese-style merchandise ranging from folk art to Buddhist scrolls to delectable confections. The cacophony of sounds and the throngs of people are wonderfully invigorating, and you can’t help but enjoy the experience, just as the locals have for centuries.

    Then it’s off to the Ginza shopping and entertainment district, where the merchandise tends to be more modern and fashionable. The list of international boutiques and stores reads like a Who’s Who of luxury designers for clothing, jewelry, fragrances and leather goods. The merchandise is absolutely exquisite throughout.

    As you will spend nearly two hours in Ginza, you are sure to see the exclusive Wako Department Store, whose clock tower has been a symbol of the district since it was erected in 1932. At the end your shopping spree, you will return to the pier.

    Please note: This tour includes nearly 3 1/2 hours of moderate walking/standing. There will be some gravel and uneven surfaces to negotiate as well as some steps. The tour is available to wheelchair guests who have a collapsible wheelchair (scooters are not permitted), are able to make their own way on and off the coach, and have an able bodied companion to assist them. The tour is not considered suitable for those with mobility concerns. Weather appropriate clothing; sun cap; sunglasses; and flat, comfortable walking shoes are recommended. The main hall of the Asakusa Temple is not wheelchair accessible and photography and video are not permitted inside the main hall. It is recommended guests bring along Japanese Yen for any additional purchases. The order of the sights viewed or visited may vary."

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  • National Museum & Ameyoko Market Street

    "Delve into Japan’s fascinating history at the Tokyo National Museum and then experience a slice of contemporary daily life at the bustling Ameyoko Market Street.

    After departing from the pier, you will drive through the city’s intriguing urban sprawl to the Tokyo National Museum, which is surrounded by serene parkland. It’s a wonderful respite from the hubbub of the city and immensely enlightening, as the museum holds the world’s largest collection of Japanese art.

    As you browse the exhibits, you may see antique kimonos, 12th-century swords, jade carvings of animals dating to the Neolithic Age, and paintings that have been designated national treasures. The collection is phenomenal as it totals more than 110,000 objects, which are displayed on a rotating basis. With so many works of art housed in five separate buildings, the museum will surely provide you with a deeper understanding of Japanese culture.

    But what’s modern life like in Tokyo? You will experience a slice of it at nearby Ameyoko Market Street, a highly popular, pedestrian-only thoroughfare lined with hundreds of shops. Merchandise includes clothing, cosmetics, electronics and every imaginable type of food.

    Once, candy was mainly sold here, and “Ameyoko” is short for a phrase meaning “candy store alley.” However, immediately following World War II, illegally imported American goods replaced the candies, and Ameyoko became a black market area. After approximately two hours of shopping here, you will rejoin your coach and return to the pier.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 90-minutes of moderate walking/standing plus any additional walking at the guests’ discretion during free time. There will be some steps to negotiate. The tour is not available to wheelchair guests and not considered suitable for those with mobility concerns. Weather appropriate clothing; sun cap; sunglasses; and flat, comfortable walking shoes are recommended. It is recommended guests bring along Japanese Yen for any purchases. The order of the sights viewed or visited may vary."

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  • Tokyo Garden and Tower

    "Enjoy Tokyo from two entirely different perspectives: while strolling through a centuries-old garden and from an observation platform high above the city.

    After departing from the pier, you will drive through the megalopolis of Tokyo to Koishikawa Korakuen Garden, a wonderfully serene setting in the heart of the city. The garden was started in 1629 and although Japanese in many ways, it also incorporates Chinese concepts such as a high-arched full moon bridge, a design that originated in China. Even the word “Korakuen” came from an ancient Chinese text and means “the garden for enjoying power later on.”

    As you stroll the winding paths, you will encounter viewpoints that reproduce famous landscapes but in miniature. For instance, one of the viewpoints is meant to look like Seiko Lake in Hangzhou, China. Elsewhere, you will see flowering bushes, bamboo-covered hills, weeping cherry trees and even rice paddies. The garden is so magnificent that it has been designated a Special Place of Scenic Beauty.

    Then it’s on to Tokyo Tower, the second-highest structure in Japan. The colossal communication tower was erected in 1958 as a symbol of Japan’s rebirth and defines Tokyo’s skyline. With its iron-lattice construction it looks remarkably similar to the Eiffel Tower, although it’s painted orange and white to comply with aviation safety regulations. After riding an elevator to the tower’s nearly 500-foot-high Grand Observation Platform, you will be treated to an astounding view of the city. Afterwards, you will return to the pier.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 2 1/4 hours of moderate walking/standing and there will be some steps to negotiate. The tour is available to wheelchair guests who have a collapsible wheelchair (scooters are not permitted), are able to make their own way on and off the coach, and have an able bodied companion to assist them. Those with mobility concerns are cautioned to carefully evaluate their personal level of stamina and ability. Weather appropriate clothing; sun cap; sunglasses; and flat, comfortable walking shoes are recommended. The order of the sights viewed or visited may vary."

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  • Tokyo Skytree and Asakusa Temple

    "Visit the oldest temple in Tokyo and then ride up a futuristic broadcast tower to its sky-high observation deck for a phenomenal view of the city and even Mt. Fuji on a clear day.

    After departing from the pier, you will drive through the megalopolis of Tokyo to Asakusa Kannon (often called Senso-ji), the oldest temple in Tokyo. Founded in the 7th century, it is dedicated to Kannon, the Buddhist goddess of compassion. After passing through the Kaminarimon or Thunder Gate, you will find a stately five-story pagoda and a Japanese-style garden whose profound serenity encourages contemplation.

    While Asakusa is known for the treasures inside, it is just as renowned for the dozens of ancient shops flanking Nakamise Street, the approach to its door. Here, you will see vendors selling merchandise ranging from folk art to Buddhist scrolls to delectable confections. The cacophony of sounds and the throngs of people are wonderfully invigorating, and you can’t help but enjoy the experience, just as the locals have for centuries.

    Continuing on, you will soon arrive at the Tokyo Skytree, the world’s tallest freestanding broadcast tower. It’s an original in every sense, including the tower’s unique white color with a tinge of blue that’s meant to pay homage to Japan’s traditional indigo dyers. While the tower’s primary role is to transmit digital broadcasts, it also features an observation deck nearly 1,150 feet above the ground. From here, you will enjoy an unrivaled, breathtaking view of Tokyo before returning to the pier.

    Please note: This tour includes nearly 2 3/4 hours of moderate walking/standing. There will be some gravel and uneven surfaces to negotiate as well as some steps. The tour is available to wheelchair guests who have a collapsible wheelchair (scooters are not permitted), are able to make their own way on and off the coach, and have an able bodied companion to assist them. Those with mobility concerns are cautioned to carefully evaluate their personal level of stamina and ability. Weather appropriate clothing; sun cap; sunglasses; and flat, comfortable walking shoes are recommended. The main hall of the Asakusa Temple is not wheelchair accessible and photography and video are not permitted inside the main hall. It is recommended guests bring along Japanese Yen for any additional purchases. The order of the sights viewed or visited may vary."

    Read More
  • Executive Collection Full Day Van

    PRICE is per vehicle

    This exclusive arrangement is designed to allow you the chance to customize your time ashore and discover the most interesting sights in the comfort and privacy of your own vehicle. With your private car and the personalized attention of your driver and English-speaking guide, you will have the flexibility and independence to design your itinerary ashore according to your own interests and sightsee at your own pace. See the most famous sights or go beyond to create your own intimate connections and unique cultural encounters.

    The Executive Collection is recommended for the single/solo traveler, couples, family, friends, and special interest groups traveling together. It can also be an excellent choice for physically challenged guests.

    Capacity: 6 guests

    PLEASE NOTE: Private cars/vans/minibuses are ordered per vehicle (not per person), and only one person in the party need order the vehicle. The price shown is the total cost for the vehicle, driver and English-speaking guide. Kindly note, however, that in certain ports only a driver/guide will be assigned (one person), due to limited availability. Entrance fees are not included in this price, in order to provide you with the most flexibility. In many ports, the number of vehicles available is extremely limited; therefore guests are encouraged to make their reservation as early as possible.

    Full-day private tours must depart between 8:00 a.m. and 9:00 am, or after 1:00 p.m.

    Upon embarkation, please consult the Destination Manager onboard to personally discuss your itinerary requirements and set your departure time.

    Read More
  • Historic Kamakura

    Discover the charms of Kamakura, an ancient capital with a profusion of temples and shrines and an exceptionally popular shopping area.

    After departing from the pier, you will commence a ninety minute drive south to Kamakura, an ancient feudal capital city that first flourished when a warlord established Japan’s first military government here in 1192. This was a time when Buddhism was spreading throughout the country, a fact reflected in Kamakura’s abundance of temples and shrines.

    Your first stop will be at the Great Buddha, an outdoor bronze statue that lords over the grounds of Kotokuin temple. Cast in 1252, the 93-ton statue was housed inside another temple until the 15th century, when a tsunami destroyed the building. The Great Buddha is seated in the lotus position, his hands positioned in a meditative gesture.

    Next, you will explore nearby Tsurugaoka Hachimangu shrine. Minamoto Yoritomo, the first shogun of the Kamakura government, founded in the shrine in the 11th century, dedicating it to Hachiman, the Shinto god of war and patron of his family. While brutalities were committed on the grounds in the violent feudal days, the present setting of lotus ponds and tree-lined lanes couldn’t be more peaceful.

    The experience will leave you in an ideal frame of mind for the excitement you can expect to encounter at historical Komachi Dori. This always-busy stylish street and the connecting alleys are lined with hundreds of restaurants and boutiques, and you will have plenty of time to explore them on your own. Afterwards, you will rejoin your coach and make the return trip to the pier.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 2-hours of moderate walking/standing plus any additional walking at the guests’ discretion during free time. There will be some steps to negotiate. The main hall at Tsurugaoka Hachimangu shrine sits atop a hill and requires 62 steps to reach. The tour is available to wheelchair guests who have a collapsible wheelchair (scooters are not permitted), are able to make their own way on and off the coach, and have an able bodied companion to assist them but is not considered suitable for those with walking difficulties. Weather appropriate clothing; sun cap; sunglasses; and flat, comfortable walking shoes are recommended. It is recommended guests bring along Japanese Yen for any purchases. The order of the sights viewed or visited may vary.

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  • Mt. Fuji and Hakone National Park

    Marvel at Japan’s spectacular natural beauty in Hakone National Park, a land dominated by steaming hot springs and Mt. Fuji, the tallest peak in Japan.

    After departing from the pier, you will settle in for a picturesque two and one-half hour drive inland to Hakone National Park, a wonderland of hot springs, dense forests and serene lakes. Still, the dominant feature remains iconic Mt. Fuji, which majestically looms in the distance beyond the park. It’s particularly stunning on clear days.

    Upon arriving in Hakone National Park, you will board an aerial gondola and enjoy a 20-minute ride up to Owakudani Station, which perches 3,425 feet above sea level. The views throughout the ride and atop the station are absolutely spectacular. Along the way, be sure to notice the plume of hot steam that continuously rises from Mt. Kami, the highest elevation within the park.

    Continuing on, you will visit Owakudani Valley, which was formed when Mt. Kami erupted some 3,000 years ago. Hot springs, steam vents and bubbling pools still rise from the valley floor, and you will enjoy excellent views of these natural phenomena. Owakudani means Great Boiling Valley, a name attributed to the whitish steam seen in so many areas.

    Leaving the valley, you will then enjoy a relaxing lunch at a hotel before heading to Lake Ashi for a leisurely cruise. Weather permitting, you will see Mt. Fuji reflected on the water’s surface, an image artists have captured for centuries. Afterwards, you will return to the pier.

    Please note: This tour includes approximately 1-hour of moderate walking which can be strenuous at times and includes uneven ground and many steps. Travel time in the coach is approximately 5 1/2 hours. There will be one rest stop in each direction traveling to and from Hakone. Additionally, there are a significant number of steps to negotiate at the Gondola stations as well as at the Hot Springs. The tour is not available to wheelchair guests and not recommended for those with mobility concerns. Weather appropriate clothing (women should avoid wearing skirts or dresses); sun cap; sunglasses and flat, comfortable walking shoes are suggested. Although Hakone National Park is one of the best locations for viewing Mt. Fuji, the mountain is often shrouded in clouds and views cannot be guaranteed. Guests who do not wish to ride the gondola can continue on in the coach. It is recommended guests bring along Japanese Yen for any additional purchases. The order of the sights viewed or visited may vary.

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